Physical therapy modalities Archives - Critical Care Science (CCS)

  • Original Article

    Physical rehabilitation in Brazilian pediatric intensive care units: a multicenter point prevalence study

    Crit Care Sci. 2023;35(3):290-301

    Abstract

    Original Article

    Physical rehabilitation in Brazilian pediatric intensive care units: a multicenter point prevalence study

    Crit Care Sci. 2023;35(3):290-301

    DOI 10.5935/2965-2774.20230388-pt

    Views6

    ABSTRACT

    Objective:

    To determine the prevalence and factors associated with the physical rehabilitation of critically ill children in Brazilian pediatric intensive care units.

    Methods:

    A 2-day, cross-sectional, multicenter point prevalence study comprising 27 pediatric intensive care units (out of 738) was conducted in Brazil in April and June 2019. This Brazilian study was part of a large multinational study called Prevalence of Acute Rehabilitation for Kids in the PICU (PARK-PICU). The primary outcome was the prevalence of mobility provided by physical therapy or occupational therapy. Clinical data on patient mobility, potential mobility safety events, and mobilization barriers were prospectively collected in patients admitted for ≥ 72 hours.

    Results:

    Children under the age of 3 years comprised 68% of the patient population. The prevalence of therapist-provided mobility was 74%, or 277 out of the 375 patient-days. Out-of-bed mobility was most positively associated with family presence (adjusted odds ratios 3.31;95%CI 1.70 - 6.43) and most negatively associated with arterial lines (adjusted odds ratios 0.16; 95%CI 0.05 - 0.57). Barriers to mobilization were reported on 27% of patient-days, the most common being lack of physician order (n = 18). Potential safety events occurred in 3% of all mobilization events.

    Conclusion:

    Therapist-provided mobility in Brazilian pediatric intensive care units is frequent. Family presence was high and positively associated with out-of-bed mobility. The presence of physiotherapists 24 hours a day in Brazilian pediatric intensive care units may have a substantial impact on the mobilization of critically ill children.

    See more
    Physical rehabilitation in Brazilian pediatric intensive care units: a multicenter point prevalence study
  • Original Article

    Brazilian version of the Critical Care Functional Rehabilitation Outcome Measure: translation, cross-cultural adaptation and evaluation of clinimetric properties

    Rev Bras Ter Intensiva. 2022;34(2):272-278

    Abstract

    Original Article

    Brazilian version of the Critical Care Functional Rehabilitation Outcome Measure: translation, cross-cultural adaptation and evaluation of clinimetric properties

    Rev Bras Ter Intensiva. 2022;34(2):272-278

    DOI 10.5935/0103-507X.20220025-en

    Views7

    ABSTRACT

    Objective:

    To translate, crossculturally adapt and evaluate the clinimetric properties of the Critical Care Functional Rehabilitation Outcome Measure for evaluating the functionality of patients admitted to intensive care units in Brazil.

    Methods:

    The process of translation and cross-cultural adaptation involved the following steps: initial translation, synthesis, back-translation, expert committee review and pretesting. The intra- and interrater reliability and agreement were analyzed between two physical therapists who evaluated the same group of patients (n = 35). The evaluations were performed by each therapist independently and blinded to the score assigned by the other professional. The qualitative analysis was performed by the review committee, and the experts adapted and synthesized the Portuguese translation of the Critical Care Functional Rehabilitation Outcome Measure.

    Results:

    There was agreement between the initial Brazilian translations of the Critical Care Functional Rehabilitation Outcome Measure scale. The conceptual, idiomatic, semantic and experimental equivalences between the original and translated versions were assessed, resulting in the final Brazilian version of the scale, called the Medida de Resultado da Reabilitação Funcional em Cuidados Intensivos. The evaluation of the clinimetric properties showed evidence of a high degree of agreement and reliability, as all had an intraclass correlation coefficient above 0.75. The overall intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.89.

    Conclusion:

    The translated version of the Critical Care Functional Rehabilitation Outcome Measure scale for assessing the functionality of patients admitted to an intensive care unit can be used reliably in Brazil following translation and cross-cultural adaptation to Brazilian Portuguese and presents evidence of excellent interrater reliability.

    See more
    Brazilian version of the Critical Care Functional Rehabilitation Outcome Measure: translation, cross-cultural adaptation and evaluation of clinimetric properties
  • Review Article

    A deep look into the rib cage compression technique in mechanically ventilated patients: a narrative review

    Rev Bras Ter Intensiva. 2022;34(1):176-184

    Abstract

    Review Article

    A deep look into the rib cage compression technique in mechanically ventilated patients: a narrative review

    Rev Bras Ter Intensiva. 2022;34(1):176-184

    DOI 10.5935/0103-507X.20220012-en

    Views8

    ABSTRACT

    Defective management of secretions is one of the most frequent complications in invasive mechanically ventilated patients. Clearance of secretions through chest physiotherapy is a critical aspect of the treatment of these patients. Manual rib cage compression is one of the most practiced chest physiotherapy techniques in ventilated patients; however, its impact on clinical outcomes remains controversial due to methodological issues and poor understanding of its action. In this review, we present a detailed analysis of the physical principles involved in rib cage compression technique performance, as well as the physiological effects observed in experimental and clinical studies, which show that the use of brief and vigorous rib cage compression, based on increased expiratory flows (expiratory-inspiratory airflow difference of > 33L/minute), can improve mucus movement toward the glottis. On the other hand, the use of soft and gradual rib cage compression throughout the whole expiratory phase does not impact the expiratory flows, resulting in ineffective or undesired effects in some cases. More physiological studies are needed to understand the principles of the rib cage compression technique in ventilated humans. However, according to the evidence, rib cage compression has more potential benefits than risks, so its implementation should be promoted.

    See more
    A deep look into the rib cage compression technique in mechanically ventilated patients: a narrative review
  • Review Article

    Manual hyperinflation in children

    Rev Bras Ter Intensiva. 2021;33(4):616-623

    Abstract

    Review Article

    Manual hyperinflation in children

    Rev Bras Ter Intensiva. 2021;33(4):616-623

    DOI 10.5935/0103-507X.20210071

    Views1

    ABSTRACT

    Manual hyperinflation is used in neonatal and pediatric intensive care units to promote expiratory flow bias, but there is no consensus on the benefits of the technique. Thus, a review that presents supporting evidence is necessary. This study aims to review the literature on the manual hyperinflation maneuver in neonatal and pediatric intensive care units to analyze the evidence for this technique in terms of the forms of application (associated with other techniques or not), its safety, the performance of manual resuscitators and the influence of the physical therapist’s experience, in addition to evaluating the methodological quality of the identified articles. A search was performed in the following databases: Web of Science, ScienceDirect, PubMedⓇ, Scopus, CINAHL and SciELO. Two researchers independently selected the articles. Duplicate studies were assessed, evaluated by title and abstract and then read in full. The quality of the articles was analyzed using the PEDro scale. Six articles were included, two of which had high methodological quality. The main results provided information on the contribution of the positive end-expiratory pressure valve to increasing lung volumes and the use of chest compressions to optimize expiratory flow bias, the negative influence of operator experience on the increase in peak inspiratory flow, the performance of different manual resuscitators when used with the technique and the safety of application in terms of maintaining hemodynamic stability and increasing peripheral oxygen saturation. The available studies point to a positive effect of the manual hyperinflation maneuver in children who are admitted to intensive care units.

    Registration PROSPERO: CRD42018108056.

    See more
    Manual hyperinflation in children
  • Original Article

    Description of physical rehabilitation in intensive care units in Argentina: usual practice and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Online survey

    Rev Bras Ter Intensiva. 2021;33(2):188-195

    Abstract

    Original Article

    Description of physical rehabilitation in intensive care units in Argentina: usual practice and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Online survey

    Rev Bras Ter Intensiva. 2021;33(2):188-195

    DOI 10.5935/0103-507X.20210026

    Views0

    Abstract

    Objective:

    To describe the usual practice of mobility therapy in the adult intensive care unit for patients with and without COVID-19.

    Methods:

    Online survey in which physical therapists working in an adult intensive care unit in Argentina participated. Sixteen multiple-choice or single-response questions grouped into three sections were asked. The first section addressed personal, professional and work environment data. The second section presented questions regarding usual care, and the third focused on practices under COVID-19 pandemic conditions.

    Results:

    Of 351 physical therapists, 76.1% answer that they were exclusively responsible for patient mobility. The highest motor-based goal varied according to four patient scenarios: Mechanically ventilated patients, patients weaned from mechanical ventilation, patients who had never required mechanical ventilation, and patients with COVID-19 under mechanical ventilation. In the first and last scenarios, the highest goal was to optimize muscle strength, while for the other two, it was to perform activities of daily living. Finally, the greatest limitation in working with patients with COVID-19 was respiratory and/or contact isolation.

    Conclusion:

    Physical therapists in Argentina reported being responsible for the mobility of patients in the intensive care unit. The highest motor-based therapeutic goals for four classic scenarios in the closed area were limited by the need for mechanical ventilation. The greatest limitation when mobilizing patients with COVID-19 was respiratory and contact isolation.

    See more
    Description of physical rehabilitation in intensive care units in Argentina: usual practice and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Online survey
  • Original Articles

    Rehabilitation through virtual reality: physical activity of patients admitted to the intensive care unit

    Rev Bras Ter Intensiva. 2019;31(4):456-463

    Abstract

    Original Articles

    Rehabilitation through virtual reality: physical activity of patients admitted to the intensive care unit

    Rev Bras Ter Intensiva. 2019;31(4):456-463

    DOI 10.5935/0103-507X.20190078

    Views1

    ABSTRACT

    Objective:

    To evaluate the level of activity that Nintendo WiiTM can elicit in intensive care unit patients and its associated safety and patient satisfaction.

    Methods:

    Experimental, single-center study performed at a tertiary care hospital. Patients ≥ 18 years old who were admitted to the intensive care unit, participated in videogames as part of their physical therapy sessions and did not have mobility restrictions were included. Th exclusion criteria were the inability to comprehend instructions and the inability to follow simple commands. We included n = 60 patients and performed 100 sessions. We used the Nintendo WiiTM gaming system in the sessions. An accelerometer measured the level of physical activity of patients while they played videogames. We evaluated the level of activity, the modified Borg scale scores, the adverse events and the responses to a questionnaire on satisfaction with the activity.

    Results:

    One hundred physical therapy sessions were analyzed. When the patients played the videogame, they reached a light level of activity for 59% of the session duration and a moderate level of activity for 38% of the session duration. No adverse events occurred. A total of 86% of the patients reported that they would like to play the videogame in their future physical therapy sessions.

    Conclusion:

    Virtual rehabilitation elicited light to moderate levels of activity in intensive care unit patients. This therapy is a safe tool and is likely to be chosen by the patient during physical therapy.

    See more
    Rehabilitation through virtual reality: physical activity of patients admitted to the intensive care unit
  • Original Articles

    Acute effects of ventilator hyperinflation with increased inspiratory time on respiratory mechanics: randomized crossover clinical trial

    Rev Bras Ter Intensiva. 2019;31(3):289-295

    Abstract

    Original Articles

    Acute effects of ventilator hyperinflation with increased inspiratory time on respiratory mechanics: randomized crossover clinical trial

    Rev Bras Ter Intensiva. 2019;31(3):289-295

    DOI 10.5935/0103-507X.20190052

    Views3

    ABSTRACT

    Objective:

    To evaluate the effects of ventilator hyperinflation on respiratory mechanics.

    Methods:

    A randomized crossover clinical trial was conducted with 38 mechanically ventilated patients with pulmonary infection. The order of the hyperinflation and control (without changes in the parameters) conditions was randomized. Hyperinflation was performed for 5 minutes in pressure-controlled ventilation mode, with progressive increases of 5cmH2O until a maximum pressure of 35cmH2O was reached, maintaining positive end expiratory pressure. After 35cmH2O was reached, the inspiratory time and respiratory rate were adjusted so that the inspiratory and expiratory flows reached baseline levels. Measurements of static compliance, total resistance and airway resistance, and peak expiratory flow were evaluated before the technique, immediately after the technique and after aspiration. Two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures was used with Tukey's post hoc test, and p < 0.05 was considered significant.

    Results:

    Ventilator hyperinflation increased static compliance, which remained at the same level after aspiration (46.2 ± 14.8 versus 52.0 ± 14.9 versus 52.3 ± 16.0mL/cmH2O; p < 0.001). There was a transient increase in airway resistance (6.6 ± 3.6 versus 8.0 ± 5.5 versus 6.6 ± 3.5cmH2O/Ls-1; p < 0.001) and a transient reduction in peak expiratory flow (32.0 ± 16.0 versus 29.8 ± 14.8 versus 32.1 ± 15.3Lpm; p <0.05) immediately after the technique; these values returned to pretechnique levels after tracheal aspiration. There were no changes in the control condition, nor were hemodynamic alterations observed.

    Conclusion:

    Ventilator hyperinflation promoted increased compliance associated with a transient increase in airway resistance and peak expiratory flow, with reduction after aspiration.

    See more
    Acute effects of ventilator hyperinflation with increased inspiratory time on respiratory mechanics: randomized crossover clinical trial
  • Review Article

    Safety and potential benefits of physical therapy in adult patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support: a systematic review

    Rev Bras Ter Intensiva. 2019;31(2):227-239

    Abstract

    Review Article

    Safety and potential benefits of physical therapy in adult patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support: a systematic review

    Rev Bras Ter Intensiva. 2019;31(2):227-239

    DOI 10.5935/0103-507X.20190017

    Views0

    Abstract

    Scientific and technological advances, coupled with the work of multidisciplinary teams in intensive care units, have increased the survival of critically ill patients. An essential life support resource used in intensive care is extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Despite the increased number of studies involving critically ill patients, few studies to date have demonstrated the safety and benefits of physical therapy combined with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support. This review identified the clinical outcomes of physical therapy in adult patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support by searching the MEDLINE®, PEDro, Cochrane CENTRAL, LILACS, and EMBASE databases and by manually searching the references of the articles published until September 2017. The database search retrieved 1,213 studies. Of these studies, 20 were included in this review, with data on 317 subjects (58 in the control group). Twelve studies reported that there were no complications during physical therapy. Cannula fracture during ambulation (one case), thrombus in the return cannula (one case), and leg swelling (one case) were reported in two studies, and desaturation and mild vertigo were reported in two studies. In contrast, improvements in respiratory/pulmonary function, functional capacity, muscle strength (with reduced muscle mass loss), incidence of myopathy, length of hospitalization, and mortality in patients who underwent physical therapy were reported. The analysis of the available data indicates that physical therapy, including early progressive mobilization, standing, ambulation, and breathing techniques, together with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, is feasible, relatively safe, and potentially beneficial for critically ill adult patients.

    See more
    Safety and potential benefits of physical therapy in adult patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support: a systematic review

Search

Search in:

Article type
article-commentary
brief-report
case-report
correction
editorial
editorial
letter
letter
other
rapid-communication
reply
research-article
review-article
review-article
Section
Articles
Artigo de Revisão de Pediatria
Artigo Original
Artigo Original de Pediatria
Artigo Original Destaque
Artigos de Revisão
Artigos de Revisão
Artigos originais
Author's Response
Brief Communication
Case Report
Case Reports
Clinical Report
Comentários
Commentaries
Commentary
Consenso Brasileiro de Monitorização e Suporte Hemodinâmico
Correspondence
Editoriais
Editorial
Editorials
Erratum
Letter to the Editor
Letters to the Editor
Original Article
Original Article - Basic Research
Original Article - Neonatologia
Original Articles
Original Articles - Basic Research
Original Articles - Clinical Research
Relato de Caso
Relatos de Caso
Research Letter
Review
Review Article
Special Article
Special Articles
Viewpoint
Year / Volume
2024; v.36
2023; v.35
2022; v.34
2021; v.33
2020; v.32
2019; v.31
2018; v.30
2017; v.29
2016; v.28
2015; v.27
2014; v.26
2013; v.25
2012; v.24
2011; v.23
2010; v.22
2009; v.21
2008; v.20
2007; v.19
2006; v.18
ISSUE