Bicarbonates Archives - Critical Care Science (CCS)

  • Original Article

    Factors associated with carbon dioxide transfer in an experimental model of severe acute kidney injury and hypoventilation during high bicarbonate continuous renal replacement therapy and oxygenation membrane support

    Crit Care Sci. 2024;36:e20240005en

    Abstract

    Original Article

    Factors associated with carbon dioxide transfer in an experimental model of severe acute kidney injury and hypoventilation during high bicarbonate continuous renal replacement therapy and oxygenation membrane support

    Crit Care Sci. 2024;36:e20240005en

    DOI 10.62675/2965-2774.20240005-en

    Views54

    ABSTRACT

    Objective

    To investigate the factors influencing carbon dioxide transfer in a system that integrates an oxygenation membrane in series with high-bicarbonate continuous veno-venous hemodialysis in hypercapnic animals.

    Methods

    In an experimental setting, we induced severe acute kidney injury and hypercapnia in five female Landrace pigs. Subsequently, we initiated high (40mEq/L) bicarbonate continuous veno-venous hemodialysis with an oxygenation membrane in series to maintain a pH above 7.25. At intervals of 1 hour, 6 hours, and 12 hours following the initiation of continuous veno-venous hemodialysis, we performed standardized sweep gas flow titration to quantify carbon dioxide transfer. We evaluated factors associated with carbon dioxide transfer through the membrane lung with a mixed linear model.

    Results

    A total of 20 sweep gas flow titration procedures were conducted, yielding 84 measurements of carbon dioxide transfer. Multivariate analysis revealed associations among the following (coefficients ± standard errors): core temperature (+7.8 ± 1.6 °C, p < 0.001), premembrane partial pressure of carbon dioxide (+0.2 ± 0.1/mmHg, p < 0.001), hemoglobin level (+3.5 ± 0.6/g/dL, p < 0.001), sweep gas flow (+6.2 ± 0.2/L/minute, p < 0.001), and arterial oxygen saturation (-0.5 ± 0.2%, p = 0.019). Among these variables, and within the physiological ranges evaluated, sweep gas flow was the primary modifiable factor influencing the efficacy of low-blood-flow carbon dioxide removal.

    Conclusion

    Sweep gas flow is the main carbon dioxide removal-related variable during continuous veno-venous hemodialysis with a high bicarbonate level coupled with an oxygenator. Other carbon dioxide transfer modulating variables included the hemoglobin level, arterial oxygen saturation, partial pressure of carbon dioxide and core temperature. These results should be interpreted as exploratory to inform other well-designed experimental or clinical studies.

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    Factors associated with carbon dioxide transfer in an experimental model of severe acute kidney injury and hypoventilation during high bicarbonate continuous renal replacement therapy and oxygenation membrane support

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