Você pesquisou por y - Critical Care Science (CCS)

You searched for:"José Colleti Junior"

We found (10) results for your search.
  • Editorial

    Waiting for the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference 3

    Crit Care Sci. 2024;36:e20240114en

    Abstract

    Editorial

    Waiting for the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference 3

    Crit Care Sci. 2024;36:e20240114en

    DOI 10.62675/2965-2774.20240114-en

    Views18
    Since the publication of a case series by Ashbaugh et al. in 1967 involving 11 adult patients and only one child, pediatricians have been trying to define acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in pediatric patients.() In 1988, Murray et al. created a score for the classification of ARDS using four variables—chest radiography, partial pressure of […]
    See more
  • Letters to the Editor

    To: Severe hypercalcemia as a form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia presentation in children

    Rev Bras Ter Intensiva. 2016;28(2):199-200

    Abstract

    Letters to the Editor

    To: Severe hypercalcemia as a form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia presentation in children

    Rev Bras Ter Intensiva. 2016;28(2):199-200

    DOI 10.5935/0103-507X.20160034

    Views3
    To the Editor, Severe hypercalcemia of malignancy in children has been extensively described in the medical literature.() However, this complication usually presents as a late symptom of acute lymphoblastic disease and not as an early manifestation, as described in a case report by Martins et al.() Colleti Junior et al.() also observed that hypercalcemia was […]
    See more
    To: Severe hypercalcemia as a form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia presentation in children
  • Letter to the Editor

    Methemoglobinemia induced by dapsone in a pediatric patient: case report

    Crit Care Sci. 2023;35(2):233-235

    Abstract

    Letter to the Editor

    Methemoglobinemia induced by dapsone in a pediatric patient: case report

    Crit Care Sci. 2023;35(2):233-235

    DOI 10.5935/2965-2774.20230018-pt

    Views7
    INTRODUCTION Methemoglobinemia is a rare condition and one of the differential diagnoses of cyanosis in the pediatric age group.() Clinical symptoms vary according to the levels of methemoglobin (MetHb) in the blood and may be nonspecific. The most common symptoms are central cyanosis, headache, fatigue, and respiratory depression.() Therefore, it is essential to recognize and […]
    See more
  • Original Article

    Physical rehabilitation in Brazilian pediatric intensive care units: a multicenter point prevalence study

    Crit Care Sci. 2023;35(3):290-301

    Abstract

    Original Article

    Physical rehabilitation in Brazilian pediatric intensive care units: a multicenter point prevalence study

    Crit Care Sci. 2023;35(3):290-301

    DOI 10.5935/2965-2774.20230388-pt

    Views7

    ABSTRACT

    Objective:

    To determine the prevalence and factors associated with the physical rehabilitation of critically ill children in Brazilian pediatric intensive care units.

    Methods:

    A 2-day, cross-sectional, multicenter point prevalence study comprising 27 pediatric intensive care units (out of 738) was conducted in Brazil in April and June 2019. This Brazilian study was part of a large multinational study called Prevalence of Acute Rehabilitation for Kids in the PICU (PARK-PICU). The primary outcome was the prevalence of mobility provided by physical therapy or occupational therapy. Clinical data on patient mobility, potential mobility safety events, and mobilization barriers were prospectively collected in patients admitted for ≥ 72 hours.

    Results:

    Children under the age of 3 years comprised 68% of the patient population. The prevalence of therapist-provided mobility was 74%, or 277 out of the 375 patient-days. Out-of-bed mobility was most positively associated with family presence (adjusted odds ratios 3.31;95%CI 1.70 - 6.43) and most negatively associated with arterial lines (adjusted odds ratios 0.16; 95%CI 0.05 - 0.57). Barriers to mobilization were reported on 27% of patient-days, the most common being lack of physician order (n = 18). Potential safety events occurred in 3% of all mobilization events.

    Conclusion:

    Therapist-provided mobility in Brazilian pediatric intensive care units is frequent. Family presence was high and positively associated with out-of-bed mobility. The presence of physiotherapists 24 hours a day in Brazilian pediatric intensive care units may have a substantial impact on the mobilization of critically ill children.

    See more
    Physical rehabilitation in Brazilian pediatric intensive care units: a multicenter point prevalence study
  • Original Article

    Evaluation of the use of electronic medical record systems in Brazilian intensive care units

    Rev Bras Ter Intensiva. 2018;30(3):338-346

    Abstract

    Original Article

    Evaluation of the use of electronic medical record systems in Brazilian intensive care units

    Rev Bras Ter Intensiva. 2018;30(3):338-346

    DOI 10.5935/0103-507X.20180057

    Views3

    ABSTRACT

    Objective:

    To examine the prevalence of the use of electronic medical record systems in Brazilian intensive care units and the perceptions of intensive care physicians regarding the contribution of electronic medical record systems toward improving safety and quality in clinical practice.

    Methods:

    Using an online questionnaire, physicians working in Brazilian intensive care units answered questions about the use of electronic medical record systems in the hospitals in which they worked. They were asked about the types of electronic medical record systems used and their levels of satisfaction with these systems in terms of improving quality and safety.

    Results:

    Of the 4,772 invitations sent, 204 physicians responded to the questionnaire. Most used electronic medical record and prescription systems (92.6%), worked in private hospitals (43.1%), worked in general adult intensive care units (66.7%) and used Private System A (39.2%); most systems had been used for between 2 and 4 years (25.5%). Furthermore, the majority (84.6%) believed that the electronic system provided better quality than a paper system, and 76.7% believed that electronic systems provided greater safety than paper systems.

    Conclusion:

    Electronic medical record systems seem to be widely used by the Brazilian intensive care physicians who responded to the questionnaire and, according to the data, seem to provide greater quality and safety than do paper records.

    See more
    Evaluation of the use of electronic medical record systems in Brazilian intensive care units
  • Letters to the Editor

    To: Contemporary treatment of children with critical and near-fatal asthma

    Rev Bras Ter Intensiva. 2016;28(3):356-357

    Abstract

    Letters to the Editor

    To: Contemporary treatment of children with critical and near-fatal asthma

    Rev Bras Ter Intensiva. 2016;28(3):356-357

    DOI 10.5935/0103-507X.20160063

    Views3
    To the Editor The review article by Shein et al.() on the treatment of acute severe asthma in children is timely due to the prevalence of the disease and often variable and inconsistent disease management, which includes adjuvant therapies and depends on the availability of resources, the local practices and the preference of doctors. The […]
    See more
  • Original Article

    Clinical practices related to high-flow nasal cannulas in pediatric critical care in Brazil compared to other countries: a Brazilian survey

    Rev Bras Ter Intensiva. 2021;33(3):384-393

    Abstract

    Original Article

    Clinical practices related to high-flow nasal cannulas in pediatric critical care in Brazil compared to other countries: a Brazilian survey

    Rev Bras Ter Intensiva. 2021;33(3):384-393

    DOI 10.5935/0103-507X.20210055

    Views2

    ABSTRACT

    Objective:

    To describe current clinical practices related to the use of high-flow nasal cannula therapy by Brazilian pediatric intensivists and compare them with those in other countries.

    Methods:

    A questionnaire was administered to pediatric intensivists in North and South America, Asia, Europe, and Australia/New Zealand for the main study. We compared the Brazilian cohort with cohorts in the United States of America, Canada, the United Kingdom, and India

    Results:

    Overall, 501 physicians responded, 127 of which were in Brazil. Only 63.8% of respondents in Brazil had a high-flow nasal cannula available, in contrast to 100% of respondents in the United Kingdom, Canada, and the United States. The attending physician was responsible for the decision to start a high-flow nasal cannula according to 61.2% respondents in Brazil, 95.5% in the United Kingdom, 96.6% in the United States, 96.8% in Canada, and 84.7% in India. A total of 62% of respondents in Brazil, 96.3% in the United Kingdom, 96.6% in the United States, 96.8% in Canada, and 84.7% in India reported that the attending physician was responsible for the decision to wean or modify the high-flow nasal cannula settings. When high-flow nasal cannula therapy failed due to respiratory distress/failure, 82% of respondents in Brazil would consider a trial of noninvasive ventilation before endotracheal intubation, compared to 93% in the United Kingdom, 88% in the United States, 91.5% in Canada, and 76.8% in India. More Brazilian intensivists (6.5%) than intensivists in the United Kingdom, United States, and India (1.6% for all) affirmed using sedatives frequently with high-flow nasal cannulas.

    Conclusion:

    The availability of high-flow nasal cannulas in Brazil is still not widespread. There are some divergences in clinical practices between Brazilian intensivists and their colleagues abroad, mainly in processes and decision-making about starting and weaning high-flow nasal cannula therapy.

    See more
    Clinical practices related to high-flow nasal cannulas in pediatric critical care in Brazil compared to other countries: a Brazilian survey
  • Case Report

    Spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage in children: report of a hemophilia patient who survived due to a brain cyst

    Rev Bras Ter Intensiva. 2015;27(4):412-415

    Abstract

    Case Report

    Spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage in children: report of a hemophilia patient who survived due to a brain cyst

    Rev Bras Ter Intensiva. 2015;27(4):412-415

    DOI 10.5935/0103-507X.20150069

    Views2

    ABSTRACT

    We report the case of a 2-year-old child who survived an acute episode of severe spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage with clinical and radiological signs of intracranial hypertension and transtentorial herniation. The patient underwent emergency surgery to drain the hematoma, and a catheter was inserted to monitor intracranial pressure. In the initial computed tomography analysis performed prior to hematoma drainage, a brain cyst was evident contralateral to the hematoma, which, based on the analysis by the care team, possibly helped to avoid a worse outcome because the cyst accommodated the brain after the massive hemorrhage. After the investigation, the patient was determined to have previously undiagnosed hemophilia A. The patient underwent treatment in intensive care, which included the control of intracranial pressure, factor VIII replacement and discharge without signs of neurological impairment.

    See more
    Spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage in children: report of a hemophilia patient who survived due to a brain cyst

Search

Search in:

Article type
article-commentary
brief-report
case-report
case-report
correction
editorial
editorial
letter
letter
other
rapid-communication
reply
research-article
research-article
review-article
review-article
Section
Articles
Artigo de Revisão de Pediatria
Artigo Original
Artigo Original de Pediatria
Artigo Original Destaque
Artigos de Revisão
Artigos de Revisão
Artigos originais
Author's Response
Brief Communication
Case Report
Case Reports
Clinical Report
Comentários
Commentaries
Commentary
Consenso Brasileiro de Monitorização e Suporte Hemodinâmico
Correspondence
Editoriais
Editorial
Editorials
Erratum
Letter to the Editor
Letters to the Editor
Original Article
Original Article - Basic Research
Original Article - Neonatologia
Original Articles
Original Articles - Basic Research
Original Articles - Clinical Research
Relato de Caso
Relatos de Caso
Research Letter
Review
Review Article
Special Article
Special Articles
Viewpoint
Year / Volume
2024; v.36
2023; v.35
2022; v.34
2021; v.33
2020; v.32
2019; v.31
2018; v.30
2017; v.29
2016; v.28
2015; v.27
2014; v.26
2013; v.25
2012; v.24
2011; v.23
2010; v.22
2009; v.21
2008; v.20
2007; v.19
2006; v.18
ISSUE